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Drought in Britain After Record March Temperatures

Over the last week, Britain has been enjoying some unseasonably warm and dry weather. Whilst this may be perfect for sitting out in the sun and enjoying the lighter evenings, there is also a downside. After the driest 18 months since records began, most of the east and south-east of England is now officially in drought.

For several days now, record temperatures have been hitting Britain. Up and down the UK people have been basking in temperatures over 20oC (68F), with the Scottish record for a March temperature being broken on Sunday and then again yesterday. Whilst we are already enjoying hotter weather than Barcelona and Nice, forecasters are now saying that the best of the weather is yet to come.

All this has led to what is shaping up to be the worst drought to hit the UK for 30 years. With the south and east of England already suffering, it is expected to spread throughout the country, to as far north as Yorkshire and as far west as Wiltshire.

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My British Curry Experiences

As part of India Week, ForeignStudents.com's very own David describes his experiences of eating Indian food in Britain and how the curry has become one of Britain's national dishes. 

I have been eating Indian food for as long as I can remember. A weekly 'curry' was common place in our household, my father having discovered the joys of eating the spiced cuisine at London's Durbar restaurant- one of London's oldest and finest Indian restaurants- when he came to London as a student in the 1950s. The restaurant is still run by the same family!

Today, there are around 9000 curry restaurants in the UK. In London, Brick Lane is synonymous with Indian cuisine. For those of you studying in Manchester, it's the 'Curry Mile' in Rusholme, which has the largest concentration of Asian restaurants in the UK, with over 65,000 diners eating weekly at one of the Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan or Bangladeshi restaurants.

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The Very Best University Memes

A new craze is sweeping through British universities...the meme. A meme is an image with writing on it that people share for a joke on the internet. Every uni has those certain little things that everyone jokes about, and there are now dozens of Facebook groups just for that purpose.

Universities from Warwick to UCL, and Man Met to Brunel have groups where students to create their own images with in jokes. We have rounded up the best of them for you below. Check them out and see if you recognize the jokes for your university:

Angelique's picture

THE END IS NEAR...

I see it! I see it! It's the finishing line. Three years has gone by so quickly.  I feel like London has become my 'home away from home.' A bitter sweet moment as I think of returning to the Seychelles and leaving my life here behind.

As the months draw near, every so often a tear rolls off my cheek as I think of this part of my life coming to an end. In 2009, it felt like I would be embarking on the longest journey of achievement ever and three years down the line, it does not feel long enough. Where has the time gone by? I feel sad as I think of leaving my friends, my 'chosen' siblings and the city of lights.

No Regrets

It must be said though, I have no regrets. I have met people who have made me laugh to tears, smile to my ears and love without boundaries. The same people I now have to leave behind as each of us follow our own paths. Saying Goodbye is indeed the hardest word. Although, I will remember them forever for making this journey bearable and memorable. I can only hope we keep in touch.

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University Applications Fall: The Statistics Explained

The final figures for applications to British universities were released yesterday, revealing an expected drop in student numbers. There was a 7.4% decrease in applications since last year, with overall numbers dropping to 540,000. However, whilst many of the statistics make grim reading fro British universities, the report revealed that non-EU international numbers actually increased by a massive 13.7%.

With the deadline for UK and EU students passing last week, the report by university admissions organisation UCAS was eagerly awaited. Next year is the first year of increased tuition fees, and many experts were predicting huge falls in applications. However, in the end, although there was a significant drop, the figures were not as alarming as many of these estimates had predicted.

Indeed, a number of important figures in UK Higher Education were actually quite optimistic. Universities UK pointed out that the "dip is far less dramatic than many were initially predicting", whilst Wendy Piatt, director general of the Russell Group of leading universities, explained:

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