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4 ways to earn while you learn in the UK

The UK has some excellent universities, and a British degree is still highly-prized by international students and employers.

But the cost of studying at a UK university can be high - and varies widely according to which area you choose and your nationality.

This means grabbing enough cash to support yourself is crucial - so here are four ways to earn while you learn in the UK.

1.   Course type

Studying a course that involves regularly attending classes in a physical campus means there's little spare time to work.

So irregular class times and commitments might mean that they type of jobs you can apply for is limited.

However, you can often study a similar degree course through distance learning at the same institution.

And the flexibility of learning when it suits you best means you can work regular hours earning a steady income.

2.   UK nations

There are also several pros and cons for studying in either England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.

With its status as a global economic and cultural capital, London's appeal is obvious. But the living costs associated with an education in the British capital can be high.

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How to Be a Mature Student in the UK

Studying in the UK isn't just for young school leavers. Age really is just a number when it comes to your education, and you're never too old to learn new skills or switch career path. A mature student is defined as anyone over the age of 21 who returns to study, a group that now makes up one-quarter of all undergraduate entrants in the UK.

Going to university as a mature student is highly rewarding. Depending on where you fall in the vast age bracket, you are perhaps no longer at an age where you take education for granted. Now, free from the distractions of youth, you can truly apply yourself to your subject and truly engage with learning materials you may have neglected before. However, returning to education as a mature student also comes with its own unique set of challenges, so here's how to make it work for you.

Apply for Funding

As you'll probably know, higher education is expensive in the UK, so you need to consider how you'll pay your tuition fees. Whether you're entitled to government funding depends on whether you already have a degree, how much you earn, and a variety of other factors, but checking this should be your first port of call. Some universities offer grants or scholarships to mature students, so it's worth seeing if this is an option for the university you plan to attend.

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Preparing for Emergency Situations While Studying Abroad in the UK

If you're gearing up to study abroad in the UK, you likely have many things on your mind - where you're going to live, what classes you'll take, what part of France you'll visit on spring break. Emergency preparedness is probably not as high on your list as, say, driving on the other side of the road and learning British slang. But questions that would come naturally to you at home, like where to call for an ambulance or what happens if you get sick, may not be readily apparent in a new country. You don't want the first time you think about how to refill a prescription to be when you've run out. This handy checklist will help prepare you for potential emergencies abroad and let you get back to researching weekend castle trips.

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UK government defeated on international student policy by House of Lords

The house of Lords voted to take international students out of the UK's net migration figures.

Peers backed an amendment tabled by Lord Hannay of Chiswick, stating that no student should be treated for public policy purposes as a long term migrant to the UK, for the duration of their studies.

The amendment passed with a large majority in favour 313 votes vs 219. The defeat is a set back for Downing street. Theresa May, who in her capacity as Home Secretary and most recently Prime Minister, did not support removing international students from net migration figures, which recent governments have pledge to bring down by "tens of thousands."

This policy has resulted in international numbers from certain countries reducing and UK institutions, loosing out to competitor countries, such as the US and Australia. The UK is currently second to the US as a provider of higher education. Lord Hannay warned that the UK is "loosing market share to our main competitors"

The Department of Education voiced its disappointment in the vote. However, the amendment will next be considered by MPs who may choose to accept or reject it. Should the bill pass, then the government would be forced into a situation where it has to encourage international students and cooperation between UK and overseas institutions. 

 

 

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Studying In the UK: 3 Unusual Degrees for Foreign Students

 

Gone are the days of students having to travel thousands of miles in search of a good education. In an effort to secure a career, it wasn't abnormal for youngsters to need to fly the nest and move to another city - or even a foreign country - to gain the skills they needed to get ahead. 

These days, however, institutions around the globe offer a veritable smorgasbord of degree choices, all designed to meet the needs of education hungry students, without the need to up sticks if they don't want to.

But what if you fancy something a little more unusual that's not readily available on your doorstep? What if you want to study in a foreign land? What if you want to endure 12 months of rain?

Well, away from your archetypal undergraduate subjects such as accounting, law or humanities, the UK is positively bubbling with a range of atypical courses designed to get your grey matter tingling. Whether you fancy a degree in viticulture and oenology or a solid grounding in Viking Studies, Dear Old Blighty really is the place to be.

To get you started, check out three of the most unusual degrees you can study in Britain ...

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