abroad

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4 Ways to Make Your Studies Abroad Economical

If your country doesn't have the right university that teaches your favorite subject, the only option left is to study abroad. But studying in a different country means added expenses. You not only have to pay for a higher tuition fee, but expenses like apartment rent, food, and transportation will also add to the list. Not many students have millionaire parents who can afford such steep expenses without a second thought. So, if you want to follow your passion and study the subject you love, here are a few ways you can make your dream more economical:

1) Look for financial aid options and scholarships

Consider this as a thumb rule: unless you apply for financial aid or scholarship, you won't get one. You shouldn't feel shy about applying. Go through the college admission form to check whether they provide any of these options to students. It doesn't matter whether you are a domestic or international student. In fact, some colleges offer financial aid because they are aware of the added expenses students need to incur after they leave their hometown.

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3 Key Things to Consider When Moving Abroad for Higher Education with Your Child

Education is said to be one of many keys to success for many looking to attain greater heights. Sometimes, this might require moving to a different country to pursue this dream. It could be because you want a change of environment, to learn about a new culture, or because the leading school for your area of specialisation happens to be abroad. If you have children, you may be worried about how you can move abroad to pursue your educational goals with them and what things you should consider before doing so. There are crucial things to think about when relocating with your child and below are three to consider. 

Requirements

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Ready to Study Abroad? Here's an Essential Checklist to Get Started

Studying abroad is life-changing. The increased maturity, self-confidence, tolerance and appreciation for diversity impact a student's life forever. And with so much riding on this experience - not to mention the excitement of immersing yourself in a completely new environment for an entire year - it's natural to be a little anxious about taking this significant step. Luckily, with the right preparation, study abroad students can avoid headaches and embarrassing mistakes. Here are our top five tips from the experts.

1. Financial Aid

Worried you'll lose your financial aid because you're studying abroad? Don't! In the U.S., federal law requires that colleges and universities continue to disburse funds for students participating in approved programs. Consult with your financial aid advisor the year before to make sure you know what additional paperwork you are responsible for, as well as any deadlines.

Also, check your eligibility for any additional scholarships and grants at www.nafsa.org. Your study abroad year is more financially possible than you might think.

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It's Not Just About Learning The Language. Be Aware Of Different Customs When Living Abroad!

When you live in a different country to the one you've grown up in, you're bound to notice that some things are done differently. Experiencing a new culture with its diverse customs is all part of the fun of living and studying abroad.

It's not just when you first arrive either. If you talk to some people who've lived in a foreign country for years, they might still be encountering cultural differences that surprise them.

So, how do the Brits do things differently, and what do you need to be aware of? Here are a few examples.

It's a long-standing joke that the British like to queue. While that might be stretching the truth a little (who really enjoys a queue?), it's fair to say that the queuing system is much more respected in the UK than in some other countries. And if anyone tries to queue-jump, they shouldn't  be surprised if the rest of the line "tuts" their disapproval - you may even get told off by your fellow queuers. So, whether it's your country's custom to queue in an orderly fashion or not, if you want a quiet life, you may as well get used to it in the UK.

Tipping Etiquette

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