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6 cleaning tips every student needs to know

When you move away to university, there can be a lot to adjust to at once. It's a time for meeting new people, expanding knowledge and living independently - and for many, the first time you've managed your own cleaning. Here are the eight tips every student should know, for a happy and healthy university life.

Create a rota

Students want two things: top grades and endless fun. If cleaning wars aren't on your university agenda, it's best to create a rota from the outset.

Get together with your housemates and create a list of tasks, then rotate each week. To make the job seem less daunting, split the rota into tasks, not rooms. This way, the rota is easily flexible, to cater for inevitably tight deadlines and exams.

When you move in, take the time to find out your waste collection day - and note this on the rota.

Organise the fridge

The secret to a sparkling kitchen is an organised fridge. Avoid food waste and foul smells by keeping a box for items approaching their use-by dates on one of the shelves, so you know what to use or clear.

Clear items from the fridge every few days, and take out kitchen bins. Food waste is the source of many student kitchen nightmares - stay on top of this rotation, and you're already enroute to a sparkling home.

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Tips for foreign students in the workplace

Having a good degree can open many doors for you, and your career is very likely plotted out in some way. However, these days, a degree is simply not enough, and if you want to optimise your future, you need to consider ways of making your CV look more professionally rounded. In a time when competition is fierce, and every job has more applicants than they can feasibly interview, it is vital that your CV gets you into the interview room and that you have something to say when you get there. The best way to accomplish this is through extracurricular activities, and whether that means a part-time job in a field relevant to your studies, unpaid work experience or even simply volunteering for a local charity, having non-academic achievements on your CV can go a long way to improving your interview chances. However, before you start applying for every job you can find, it's important that you're aware of your rights.

Your employer

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Tips for Hosting a Foreign Exchange Student

Every single year, there are thousands of students from around the world that enter into student foreign exchange programs.  Basically, students travel to other countries to learn other languages or cultures while attending a year at school in that country.  Going to the United Kingdom as a student has some specific challenges, but if you are hosting a student from the United States or any country, there are a few tips that can help you get through the process. Hosting a student does require some diplomacy as things are going to be new for the both of you.  Hopefully, these tips can help you.

Remember the Student Is the Guest

One thing that you will have to remember is that the student you are hosting is the guest in your home and they may not be ready for the challenges coming at them.  Even if you have a great family with a husband and kids of your own, the student may not be used to that style of family life.  Keep an open mind and make sure the student feels at home and that feeling must come from all the host family members. 

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4 top tips for a stress-free out-of-town job interview

Long gone are the golden days when companies would hover around universities recruiting fresh-faced graduates for high-paying schemes. Now most of us have to look pretty far afield to get a decent starting salary, or indeed any salary at all.

And being forced to travel just to get a 15-minute meeting with a potential employer makes the whole interview process 100 times more stressful than it normally is.

You're not just trying to prepare some answers and get your CV in tip-top shape, you're also dealing with crashing on a friend's sofa or surviving a cheap hotel room in a strange city you're completely lost in.

So that you can concentrate on that all-important prep work, we're sharing a few top tips that'll help make your next out-of-town interview go much smoother. Take a look.

#1: calculate travel expenses before you go

Before you agree to an interview, calculate travel expenses so that you can determine whether or not it's worth it. It might seem awkward, but ask if they offer compensation for travel costs. Lots of bigger companies will, although they may not always advertise it.

If they don't provide financial help, then check Skyscanner for deals on any flights you need and Airbnb for cheaper accommodation, to save as much money as possible.

#2: don't cut it too fine

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Practical Tips on Embracing Life In a New Country

Living in another country is an exciting prospect, but when you've been there a couple of weeks and the novelty of being somewhere new wears off, it's normal to go through a period where you might feel a little isolated and out of sorts.

This is entirely natural; you've started living in a society that is different to the one you've grown up in and some things are bound to feel strange. However, the best thing to do at this point is to take some practical steps to increase your sense of belonging, rather than remaining an outsider. Here's how to start making those connections.

Get Some Guidance

You might be feeling lonely or homesick, away from the support network of family and friends you've always had around you. Of course, you can stay in touch with them via social media and phone calls, but that isn't always enough to help you feel settled. In fact, it can sometimes make your isolation feel greater.

If you are wondering why you made the choice to study abroad and doubt your resolve to stick with the course, try having a psychic reading to allow you to consider what you're looking to achieve. Most people find it enlightening to talk to a third party such as a psychic as they can offer insights into why someone has made certain decisions in life.

Socialise Through Sport

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