Student

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3 Ways to Gain that All-Important Work Experience

‘Experience' is an essential yet sometimes equally elusive part of the working world. Many graduates are repeatedly saddened and frustrated to find out that they can have the best academic record but without relevant experience in the field that they're interested in, they are often turned away from job after job. When most companies are asking for experience but no company will give you any then it can be an endless dark loophole. But it's not all doom and gloom. If no one will give you it then you have to go out and get it! Here are three simple ways that you can get that all-important experience for the job you want and nail the next interview.

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How to be a Successful Student Landlord

Becoming a student landlord can be both a positive and a profitable venture, but only if you do it properly. When you're planning on renting to students, it pays to be prepared. If you're a landlord new to student lets, and you want to ensure that your newest endeavour is a success, here is some essential advice to help you on your journey, from tips on purchasing a suitable property to advice for finding your first tenants.

Do Your Research First

It's important to contemplate the complexity and hard work involved in managing a property business. Like any commercial endeavour, the general rules of running and marketing an enterprise apply. You will be required to invest time and capital in coming to understand your customers and then providing them with the products and services they desire at a viable price. Managing a profitable student letting business is a yellow brick road to riches: uncertain; fraught with dangers; and a lot harder to travel than it might first look. After hours, you'll need to familiarise yourself over and over with the ever mutable laws on tenancies and letting, and complete your accounts and tax returns. 

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A Guide to Postgraduate Open Days

It's that time of year when open days are starting to crop up, and if you're interested in postgraduate study, such as an MBA course, it's a good idea to get a couple of them in your diary. Manchester Business School's postgraduate open day, for example, takes place on the 27th November and provides visitors with an opening to speak to staff and current students, giving them more information about the postgraduate courses on offer. It also means that prospective students can get a feel for the area that they'd be living and studying in.

So, if you plan to attend, what should you expect on the day? And, is there anything you can do to prepare? Take a look at this short guide to postgraduate open days...

What you can expect

Register - During your registration or welcome session, you should be given a schedule, so that you can be aware of where you need to be and at what time. It's helpful to plan out your day when you get this schedule. There will be a number of different talks and presentations, so make a note of the ones you're interested in and find out where they will be held.

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Dealing with Money in Britain

Moving to Britain can mean that you'll be dealing with a lot of new things, and one of the most commonly encountered one is an entirely different currency. Wherever you're from in the world, the British pound will be new to you, and there are some useful things to know when using it.

Exchange Rates

The first and most immediately apparent difference you're likely to notice is that £1 is more valuable than just about any other single unit of currency in the world. This has the effect of making prices for things like groceries appear to be quite low in comparison, simply because the number will be lower, even if the value is actually the same.

In order to make sure that you know how much things actually cost, it's very important that you become familiar with the exchange rate between the pound and whichever currency you're most used to using. When you know this, you'll be able to shop smartly, and will be able to know when something is good value or not. It's a good idea to look at the actual exchange rate to get the best idea, not the prices that the bureau de change is offering.

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Just How Important is Sunlight to Students?!

I was surprised to see that one of the UCL student residences was nominated amongst the worst new buildings in Britain. Being used to the student life, I could imagine peeling walls, dirty lavatories, rusty pipes, hoards of unattended rubbish and so on. But my surprise grew when I realized that the main concern was the lack of sunshine due to the adjacent building. Moreover, it affected only 23 rooms.

In my experience, students usually go to their rooms only if they want to sleep. Often, they get to their bed early in the morning (after a night spent partying or studying) and in that case, the shadow would be an asset. It is hard to sleep when the morning sun knocks at your window.

Student residences in Slovakia, where I did my studies, have different problems - the ones I originally expected at the UK's. But the situation is not so bad, compared to the price. The monthly prices in the UK might run so high that in some residences in Slovakia you could live for the whole academic year.

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