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English vs British: What Exactly Does ‘British’ Mean?

Chances are you've heard a few jokes and a few arguments over the last week about whether Andy Murray is Scottish or British. The old joke is that when he is losing, the English refer to him as Scottish, but when he is winning (like last weekend) he is most definitely British.

If you're not from Britain all the terminology and minor differences can get very confusing. Many other nationalities seem to use the terms ‘English' and ‘British' interchangeably- which is certainly not the case and can get you into a spot of bother.

Indeed, even the New York Times struggled with it this week, announcing Murray's win as one for England rather than Britain, despite the fact Murray is from Scotland:

Andy Murray Wins Wimbledon to End British Wait

In front of a packed Centre Court crowd and searing temperatures, Andy Murray did the unthinkable and won Wimbledon yesterday, beating Novak Djokovic in straight sets. It ended a 36-year wait for a British winner and amazingly is the first time a British man has won the prestigious tournament for 77 years.

Coming into the match Murray not only had the world number 1 facing him, but also the nation's expectations on his shoulders. As well as the 15,000 spectators packed into Centre Court, a further 4,000 were sat on ‘Murray Mount' (surely this can replace ‘Henman Hill' now?!) and a huge 17.3 million British people watching at home- making it the most watched TV moment of 2013.

As the players came out to warm up, on court temperatures reached a staggering 50oC (122F)- one of the hottest Wimbledon finals on record. Whilst the players may be used to playing in these sort of temperatures in the US and Australian Opens, the British crowd were certainly not. St John Ambulance revealed that they treated 79 fans inside Wimbledon for heat related ailments during the final, including dehydration, sunburn and heat exhaustion.

Gruelling Rallies

Watch the highlights of the match:

International Students to Start Paying for NHS?

The British government is considering charging non-EU students £200 a year for access to the NHS as part of radical new plans to cut costs for the health service.

The charge would be added to visa costs for any students staying in the UK for more than 6 months, and is just one of a number of proposals being put forward. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt told the BBC that the fee is in line with what other countries charge international students for healthcare, explaining:

"We have been clear that we are a national health service not an international health service and I am determined to wipe out abuse in the system."

The Department of Health claims that currently it costs the NHS £30m a year to treat foreigners in England. However, whilst this may sound like a lot, to put it in context, that is the equivalent of just two hours of NHS's annual spending.

Growing Opposition

Though the possibility of this scheme was only revealed this morning, a number of vocal opponents to any such changes have already emerged.

Mumford and Sons Close a Memorable Glastonbury 2013

Glastonbury music festival ended last night after 3 days of live music, huge crowds and (unusually) pretty good weather.

British folk band Mumford and Sons closed this year's festival, headlining the main stage last night. In their typically energetic style they got the crowd dancing throughout their set, before ending with a unique rendition of the classic Beatles song ‘With a Little Help from my Friends'. Fittingly, they got a number of other performers to join them on stage for the final song, including Vampire Weekend, The Vaccines and The Staves- you can watch it below.

A Big Weekend for British Sport

The football season may be over, but it is still a big summer of sport for Britain, no more so than over the last few days. The Lions British rugby team played their first match on Saturday against Australia, before the England cricket team played India in the final of the ODI Champions Trophy, which was followed up with the start of Wimbledon yesterday.

Lions Hang on Against Australia

Once every four years, the best rugby union players from England, Ireland Scotland and Wales are brought together to represent the Lions. They then tour a southern hemisphere country, playing against the national team in a series of games.

This time around, they are touring Australia, and after endless warm-up matches, they finally played the first ‘Test' (against Australia's national team) on Saturday. In a topsy-turvy match that turned into a mini-classic, there were stunning tries, ridiculous misses and plenty of big hits. Watch the highlights below:

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