studying abroad

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Ways to Pay for Studying Abroad

Studying abroad is the opportunity of a lifetime. However, whether you choose to study in the UK or in another foreign country, it is very expensive. If you don't have the help of parents, it is even harder. However, there are ways to make it easier for yourself financially.

If you are thinking about studying abroad, here are a few tips to help you pay for your studies without getting into tons of debt:

Saving the Hard Way

Students usually know they are going abroad several months ahead of time. You should start saving immediately. Save every extra penny you get. Save holiday money if possible. Instead of going to the movies or dinner, save that cash. You won't regret it when you are enjoying the beauty of Spain, the bright lights of London or the beaches in Australia. Travelling the world is far more exciting than a temporary thrill at the movies.

Using A Credit Card

Before using a credit card, you should research the best credit cards to have. This will help you learn about the interest rates, perks and if they work internationally. You should be smart with your credit choice for overseas travel, but they can literally save your life in a pinch. You shouldn't travel abroad without one. Credit cards small business owners have are usually the lowest in interest. You may want to look into getting one of those.

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The Best Place to Stay in London

Every full-time student and professional trainee can become a member of International Student House (or ISH for short), the amazing residential hall in the centre of London that I am proud to call home. However, ISH is much more than a residence. It is actually a cultural, intellectual and social center where activities literally do not stop thanks to the efforts of a fun and dedicated staff, especially the ISH events team.

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My Relationship with London

Someone recently shared with me an electronic copy of A Baseball Game in London and other Exaggerated Chronicles, a short book written by a fellow Cuban who spent a few years in London completing a PhD. The Cuban literary magazine Cubaliteraria had invited the author to write a series of vignettes about British culture, as experienced by his own senses. What results is an insightful and at times hilarious memoir that shows how even a baseball-loving Caribbean can find and love his home in London.

This not-so-baseball-loving Cuban can understand. I too have come to embrace London as a fourth(!) home. As a foreigner, I am a proud member of a majority group, sharing seminars and meals with people from Tibet, Kosovo, the Philippines, Kazakhstan, Vietnam. London has brought us together and allowed us to discover that we actually can laugh at the same jokes.  

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The Horribly Terrifying but Ultimately Successful Search for Housing

I had been warned and I confirmed it: looking for accommodation is the one nightmare that foreign students will have to face before they can settle into the otherwise wonderfully student-friendly city of London.

Fortunately, I had friends in London that came to the rescue after I called for help. A couple of months before my arrival, my friends showered my inbox with e-mails full of invaluable advice on how to make the most of my housing search, even from the United States. There I submitted online applications to LSE residence halls as well as International Students House (ISH), a private residence hall for university students. When LSE rejected my application and ISH put me on a wait list, I was thrown against my will into the world of letting agents and websites of available rents.

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