News

Inspiring's picture

How to Get an Internship at an SME

A 2014 LinkedIn study asked students what they value most when considering a job. The results show that students value work/life balance most, closely followed by benefits, company culture, clear career progression, and a sense of pride about where you work (as fifth out of five).

 

Work-hard. Play-hard.

Opportunities for the above values, as well as greater responsibility and flexibility, are available when you get graduate jobs at an SME. I can vouch for that. Having joined a start-up in 2014 who were making waves in the graduate recruitment industry, relatively little micro-management enabled me to have creative control over the content I was producing, assess the analytics of campaigns and get good work noticed.

Inspiring's picture

10 Things to Do at University to get a Graduate Job

There are a number of thing you can do outside of the classroom during your time at university that will help towards securing dream graduate jobs.

 

Volunteer

Volunteering abroad is a great experience and looks great on your CV – and so does volunteering locally. Approach your university, local charities and not-for-profit organisations to gain relevant industry experience. For other industries, network professionally and set up a week's work shadowing during reading week, or two days a week at a local agency.

 

Get part-time work

A part-time job gives you the facts and figures to back up your well-written graduate CV, and you never know what connections you’ll make through your work.

 

Make the most of media

Contribute to university media outlets. There are multiple opportunities ready for the taking on campus, including: writing for the university newspaper, hosting or producing a university radio/TV show or getting involved in the annual fashion show.

 

Inspiring's picture

How to Make Your CV Stand Out

Recruiters receive hundreds of CV applications for graduate jobs every day, so it’s crucial you make your CV the best it can be. A recruiter has specific roles in mind when sifting through applications, so it’s essential you tailor your CV to every job you apply for. 

 

What’s your story?

Recruiters are interested in the route you took to get where you are today. Did you spend a gap year backpacking around Australia? Mention it! The less unexplained gaps in your CV and the more relevant details you give, the easier it will be for them to see your development.

 

What’s your Unique Selling Point?

Picture this: Ten people with the same degree, same grade from the same university apply for the same job. Who will be invited to the interview? The candidate who is able to stand out and draw attention to what makes them different. It could be that you were involved with a charity, organising events at university, winning prizes for outstanding achievements, writing a blog, etc. If you did something unique, include it in your CV. It demonstrates that you’re a well-rounded individual, and could take you one step closer to securing great graduate jobs.

Séamas's picture

San Sebastian Film Festival 2015: Charlie Kaufman Masterclass

A highlight for many at this year's San Sebastian-Donostia film festival was the presence of screenwriting ace Charlie Kaufman who notably wrote such idiosyncratic gems as Being John Malkovich, Adaptation and The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.

More recently he's forayed into direction and carried his originality a stage further. Synecdoche, New York, starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, was his first directorial outing, which garnered more respect than acclaim. He then went on to write an experimental theatre piece called Anomalisa, now turned into a feature film that, after its Venice and Telluride screenings last month, has thus far maintained a 100% critical rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

Anomalisa is an odd, dark, dredging of the human soul. That it should do this with such probingly uncomfortable insight - and be made in stop-motion animation - is testimony to Kaufman and to animation specialist Duke Johnson, who co-directed. In the San Sebastian catalogue, Anomalisa is simply described in one sentence (in Basque, Spanish and English): "A man struggles with his inability to connect with others". This belies the fact that our hero is a British inspirational speaker in Cincinnati to give a talk to about his book to adoring fans.

Séamas's picture

San Sebastian Film Festival 2015 – Rural Icelandic Drama Takes the Top Prize

San Sebastian Film Festival may not be as high on the A list of film festivals as Cannes is, but its vast city centre beaches beat Cannes' into a cocked hat. It's only normal then that their prizes are called shells, or Concha, as in seashells, in shades of gold for best film and three silver for runner up categories.

This year's gold, the Concha de Oro, went to Sparrows, written and directed by Runar Runarsson. Sparrows is an intricate coming of age story that takes place in rural Iceland. 16-year-old Ari is shunted to remote Westfjords from Reykjavik by his mother. She's off to save Africa, and he now has to contend with his dead-beat dad, country life and sexual awakenings in a place where there's not much to do. So far, so thematically predictable, but, by all accounts, the quality of the filmmaking and its narrative finesse turned it to gold in Donostia (the Basque name for the town). It's worth observing for a country as small as Iceland that this is the second rural drama with zoological title to get a major award this year. Rams took the top prize in the Un Certain Regard section of Cannes 2015.

Syndicate content