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Foreign Students's picture

#UniHasMadeMeRealise: The Best Things Learnt at University

For many of you, exams will have finished and another year of university is coming to a close. Whether it has been your exciting first year, or your more strenuous final year, no doubt you'll have learnt something about yourself and life over the last 12 months.

On Twitter, a hashtag has been trending this morning with people revealing what their university experience has made them realise. From how much sleep they need, to how they deal with deadlines, to what food they'll eat when desperate, it seems university teaches you a lot about yourself.

Some are funny, others poignant, but we've gathered together some of the best #UniHasMadeMeRealise tweets for you below.

 

Erik's picture

Extraordinary People: Yoghurt Guru & King of the Beggars

Every day last week, I tried to pick up and follow the story of one person who has achieved something extraordinary. I ended up with the stories of three people who can be considered world changers. Their achievements required skill, effort, or at least an extra-DNA of courage.

Turkish Yoghurt Entrepreneur

Hamdu Ulukaya (pictured above), the founder of the Chobani Greek yoghurt brand taught Americans to eat yoghurts. His healthy products managed to compete with coconut water and all the commercial goods topping the supermarket shelves.

He says that the yoghurts the Americans had been eating for years were a farce, too weak and too sweet. He brought the Greek yoghurt to the US 15 years ago. Since then, Hamdu has become a millionaire and his company supplies 36% of all yoghurts sold in the US.

The World's Most Famous CIA Agent

Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old man without a university education got a job at the CIA thanks to his talent and computer skills. He then went on to leak millions of secret documents on top-secret NSA programmes to newspapers. Although intended as an anti-terrorist vigilance, the leaked surveillance methods being used by the US government collided with human rights.

Manuela's picture

Film Review: Fast & Furious 6 & The Great Gatsby

Last month has flown by; May has been hectic with the end of my first university year abroad. I was meant to make the most out of my stay but the weather has forced me to stay in!

I was watching the news the other day on a French TV channel and the reporter claimed that cinemas have made huge profits recently due to the poor weather. This is most likely to be true, as I have been going cinema quite often and I have couple of reviews for you here. First and my favourite as well:

Fast & Furious 6

The movie is definitely a must-see, with humour and terrific action scenes. Even though the ending was a bit long with the world’s longest take off, the movie remains great.

I have been surprised by how great the movie was (well to my opinion at least) although it contains a bit of drama as it is a classic, typical action movie with fight scenes, explosions, and car races…

It is a great action film that offers an adrenaline rush and breathtaking scenes. I recommend it warmly.

Ludovica's picture

Turkey Protests: On the footsteps of Syria?

The battle to save the green hid much deeper reasons of the malcontent of Turkish civilians. It was the 31st of May when dozens of people gathered in Gezi Park, Istanbul, and protested against the government’s plan to demolish the park in order to build up a shopping centre.

However, the protests soon revealed a population which is highly disappointed by the government’s actions and the PM Tayyip Erdogan’s attempt to impose Muslim-orientated values on the secular state.

The Turkish citizen İnsanlik Hali - who addressed a letter to the world in which he explains the reasons of the protests and provides the account of the ongoing situation (widely ignored by the media in the first stage of its developments) – explains:

“They [the protesters] all gathered to prevent the demolition of something bigger than the park: The right to live as honorable citizens of this country. People who are marching to the center of Istanbul are demanding their right to live freely and receive justice, protection and respect from the State. They demand to be involved in the decision-making processes about the city they live in.”

Erik's picture

Cardiff: Cheap Travel & Rugby

I decided to visit Cardiff - the capital and the political, financial, industrial and sporting centre of Wales.

I had never been to Wales before, but knew a bit of its history and culture, as Welsh and Scottish nationalism was the topic of my Master's thesis. And it really is a bit different to England compared to the commuter's jungle of London where I live.

The weather was hot- enough to wear just a t-shirt. In London, a hoodie or an umbrella always comes handy. First up, I took a public transport bus to the Cardiff Bay (pictured above) to see the sea. An all day ticket was just £3.40. In London, this gets you just one peak-time journey on the Tube.

I know, I should not compare the incomparable, because there are reasons for the differences (maintenance costs, amortisation and replacement of the material abused by millions of travellers a day), but I cannot help it.

My trip continued in Cardiff Bay with the Wales Millennium Centre, Senedd (the Welsh National Assembly) and the Doctor Who Experience.

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